The Passing: The Road Ends, The Journey Begins (Chapters 11 & 12)

It occurred to me as the day waned and I grew footsore that Gran had never taught me to ride anything: not a horse, mule, lizard, large cat, bird, or even a dragon. (We had no such creatures other than horses and mules, but by then my imagination was in full bloom to take my mind off the pain).
We walked wherever we had to go, and she turned those sojourns into lessons of woodlore and nature. She taught me of weather patterns, plants, insects, the way of rivers, gardening, the change of seasons, and if we walked at night, the stars.
I thought of asking the spirits to transport me, but as I considered it, that had problems of its own. The spirit hadn’t given me his name, so I couldn’t summon him.
Another thing was, if I just appeared somewhere, scaring the wits out of whoever was nearby, I wouldn’t be able to shake the attention that would follow, and attract all manner of human creatures looking for ‘favors.’
In the end, three things decided me: I didn’t know how to do a transport spell, and I didn’t trust or name the spirit that could help me.
I walked-stumbled-shuffled, shutting out the pain as best as I could; I promised my feet something luxurious the first chance I got, and pushed on because if I stopped I wouldn’t continue, and I wanted to be off the road by nightfall.
With the last of my reserves topping the rise, the next town,Karrela’s Point, came mercifully into view.
*********
I was eating alone, the pain in my feet now down to a throb, when he slid in across the seat from me.
“I didn’t say you could join me, stranger.”
He nodded, agreeing, but said “I didn’t ask. The place is crowded, this space was empty, and I needed a place to sit.”
“But that was rather bold and rude of you to not ask at least, considering…”
He extended his hand across the table for me to take as he asked, “And what would you have honestly said, after you looked around and saw my predicament?”
I felt my cheeks heat and color as he grinned and extended his hand a bit more.
“My name’s Terrell. And you are…?”
In the instant I had, I realized he was right; me being hostile and impulsive, had he been of a different temperament, could have had a different ending for me.
I found myself staring at him before I realized my hand was now in his. “Tina.”
He had a soldier’s strength just beneath the surface of his grip, and a courtly appearance and bearing.
  Very well, then.
“Pleasure to meet you, Tina. Are you alone here? Karrela’s Point can be a treacherous place for the unwary.”
  Apparently.  “I was alone, but as you haven’t left yet, that’s no longer so. I would formally ask you to leave, but I know now it wouldn’t do any good.”
“No, it wouldn’t.” His grin was so full of self-realization that it annoyed me, even as it almost made me smile.  “You’ll need a friend here, Tina. At least, as they say, ‘a local point of contact,’ to help you navigate whatever waters you’re going to explore here.”
He helped himself to a chunk of bread that was cooling on the table.
I sighed. “What do you want, Terrell. Really?”
He stopped just before he put the bread in his mouth, placing it back on the table, and his grin vanished as if it never happened at all.
He stood up. “The offer was free, Tina. Now it isn’t. When you get around to needing my services, I’ll give you my price list.”
“You haven’t told me what your services are, so how will I know if I need them?” I tried to retain a sassy note, but it trembled and ran under the weight of his stare as his irises turned blood red.
“If you stay here for any length of time, you will.” They went back to their normal brown as quickly as they’d changed, almost making me doubt if it had happened, but a small stirring in my stomach told me it had, and it wasn’t a good thing.
Still looking at me, he swept his arm, taking in the whole floor. “You all will.”
The grin returned, and he reached down and stuffed the larger portion of the loaf into a pocket on his cloak, leaving me the piece he’d torn off, and whistling tunelessly, walked out of the inn.

Chapter 12:
I determined that night to get the spirit’s name; it had been him stirring in my gut when Terrell’s eyes changed, souring my mood and meal.
He is a spell blocker.
Now you speak?
It hurts…
A spell blocker. There’d been no mention of them in Gran’s journal, but she’d told me of some unpleasant encounters dealing with them. She spoke of them with disdain, and not a little fear.
My senses now heightened to what the spirits might say, or if they’d do anything to Terrell, I finished my meal without tasting it.
Back to silence.
Taking stock of my current circumstances: alone, homeless, and possibly in mortal danger from the extremes of the magic spectrum, combined to wear me down.
Though I knew better, I convinced myself I was just tired from the road; the rest would have to wait, and hopefully would.
I paid for my dinner.
While leaving I drew a few desultory glances that my direct eye contact kept from turning into a challenge, or ambitious curiosity, and stepped out into the evening.
One of the serving girls was outside on her break.
“How much for a hot bath?”
She turned to me, gave me a once-over, her normally flinty expression softening; I guess I really looked that forlorn and bedraggled.
“None here, but there’s public ones in the Square.”
Damn. More money…
I thanked her, went to my room to pack a change of clothes, and went back out to find the Square. It wasn’t far, and the way through the closed market was torchlit and patrolled. Being alone and female, what guards I encountered looked at me and filed my appearance away in their minds, but said nothing.
The Baths, as it said on the slab of ivory marble that adorned its awning, was an enormous structure, which meant expensive.
I should have asked where the river was instead…
“You’re here now, Tina,” I told myself, and stepped into a warm place where steam rolled across the floor like lost and wayward spirits.
There was quiet, muted chatter that didn’t stop as I entered, and an attendant soon came over to help.
“Good evening, Miss. This way, please.”
I followed her. Despite the quiet chatter, this late in the evening the place was almost empty. I could hear the soft pat of sandals around the springs as the attendants, all of an age with me, went about their duties either attending the bathers, or other things that would need to be done before they closed.
“Here’s where you change, Miss.”
“Thank you.”
“My name is Diana.”
“Thank you, Diana.”
She gave me a small smile. “Call me if you need me. I’ll be in my booth. This is the rope to ring my calling bell.”
She reached up to show me, and I hadn’t even noticed it, reprimanding myself for just not going to sleep in my day dirt and leaving first thing in the morning.
Spirits, is there anything amiss here?
Silence. I decided that was a good sign. I laid out my clean clothes for the walk back, and stashed the dirty ones in my pack.
My towel barely allowed for modesty, but the sandals Diana left me seemed new; if not, this was no time to be picky.
The water was exhilaratingly warm, and surprisingly clean; I wanted to float and sleep the night away, but it was not to be.

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